Make up artist Sally Bunting: “Never let your creativity be caged, let it out”

Words by Steph Hodgkinson

Make up artist Sally Bunting

Make up artist Sally Bunting. Image courtesy of Sally

Make up artist Sally Bunting, 21, has been freelancing for the past few years. She gives Polka Dots & Potions an insight into the highs and lows of her job…

Being a make up artist might seem like one of the most glamorous careers, but life as a make up artist isn’t easy. Freelancing is particularly difficult in the current economic climate, as make up artist Sally Bunting says: “It’s a very expensive career and the work isn’t always constant.

“It’s hard because people assume I can get to all the locations easily. There are always people who want something for nothing as well but the products are expensive, so I have to think whether it’ll be of any benefit to me and my portfolio.”

The 21-year-old from Sheffield has been freelancing for the past few years and does make up for everything from weddings and proms to music videos, photoshoots and fashion shows. She studied cosmetic, theatrical, special effects and media make up at Sheffield City College.

Sally's 'wound' special effects make up

Sally’s ‘wound’ special effects make up. Image courtesy of Sally

Sally is under pressure to get the look right to ensure her clients are satisfied with their makeovers. She says: “There is a certain amount of pressure, but I always emphasise that if they want anything changing that they tell me. I wouldn’t be offended.

“A lot of it comes down to personal preference, especially with weddings, but I include a trial with my wedding packages to prevent situations like that on their big day.”

Sally’s favourite shoot was one of her first shoots for a photography student. “Her theme was ‘The Seven Deadly Sins’. It was really fun, and I enjoyed how I had a theme to stick to, but each look was totally different.”

Sally on the set of a photoshoot. Image courtesy of Megan Smith

Sally on the set of a photoshoot. Image courtesy of Megan Smith

She says the highlights of the job outweigh the expenses, though: “One of the best things about the job is the proud feeling I get when I get the images back, or when I help to make a bride’s day special.”

Her dream client would be Lady Gaga or Marilyn Manson because “both are incredibly individual and their looks are very creative.”

So which products does she swear by? “There’s a discontinued No7 Highlighter, which I cherish! It looks amazing for any look, especially bridal makeup. Brand-wise I use a lot of MAC, Illamasqua and Ben Nye. I’m also HD airbrush trained, so I use Airbase for that.”

Although it can sometimes be tough, Sally’s found her ideal career. What’s her advice for aspiring make up artists?

“Save up as much money as you can! It helps when you can afford high quality brushes and products. Also, never let your creativity be ‘caged’, let it out.”

Make up by Sally, modelled by Sally

Sally modelling her make up techniques. Image courtesy of Sally

Read more from Steph here

CTPA confirms; ‘European Union bans lead in lipsticks’

By Railah Iqbal

Websites; ‘Urban Legends’ and ‘Snopes’ have claimed that rumours stating designer make-up brands which allegedly use lead in their lipsticks for longer wear, are untrue. Also, the European Union has banned lead in lipsticks explains CTPA; cosmetics’ authority.

Courtesy  of ‘Urban Legends’ site

Courtesy of ‘Urban Legends’ site

Make-up brands under question include; Avon, Christian Dior, Clinique, Estee Lauder, Lancôme and Yves Saint Laurent.

Courtesy of ‘Urban Legends’ site Urban Legends state that using metal such as lead which leads to cancer development is true however the lipstick rumours are a hoax and a Facebook message, 2013, stating; ‘After doing a test on lipsticks, it was found that the Yves St. Laurent (YSL) lipstick contained the most amount of lead’ is fake.
Further statements claiming the more lead there is used in the lipsticks, the longer they are likely to last is untrue and checks such as the “The Gold Ring Test” can be done at home to prove whether the lipsticks contain lead are not 100% viable.

Diorific’ lipstick advertisement on Christian Dior’s site

Diorific’ lipstick advertisement on Christian Dior’s site

Elena, Christian Dior’s’ representative, said; “She had not heard that the Christian Dior have ever or would ever use lead in any of their cosmetics.”
She added that Christian Dior’s cosmetics department policy enables them to send out details of ingredients used in their products, especially the two longer lasting lipsticks; ‘Diorific Extreme’ and ‘Dior Addict,’ to people to clear doubts over their cosmetic’s contents.

Further, Eleanor O’Connor, The Cosmetic, Toiletry and Perfumery Association’s co-ordinator, confirms that CTPA as the UK’s cosmetics’ industry  representative and is its authoritative public voice, “would not allow Lead in lipsticks because all cosmetics and personal care products (which include lipsticks and lip glosses), made in or imported into the UK and Europe, must be safe. There are strict European cosmetic laws, and these require manufacturers to carry out a rigorous safety assessment.”

CTPA site-- Screenshot

CTPA site– Screenshot

CTPA states; “The use of lead in cosmetic products is specifically banned in the European Union by the cosmetics legislation… it is possible that minute traces are carried into cosmetic products from the environment or during manufacture. These extremely low levels are taken into account in the safety assessment to ensure their presence does not risk human health.”

If you fancy doing “The Gold Ring” test, here’s how it works:
1) Find a 24-Carat gold ring.
2) Rub some lipstick on your hand.
3) Then wipe the gold ring over the lipstick.
4) Wait a couple of seconds for any colour change.
5) If the colour changes to black then there is alleged Lead content.

Read more stories from Railah

Tutorial: Confessions of a Concealaholic

by Bridget Owen

It’s been reported by the Harley Medical Clinic that women spend around 474 days of their lives putting make-up on, which translates to around 3 and a half hours per week.

Confessions of a Concealaholic by Benefit is all set to change that hectic make-up schedule, and greatly minimise the amount of make-up you have to carry, by being available in a little set.

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If you have irritating spots or dark under-eye circles like me, this tutorial is just for you!

We also have an interview with a professional beauty therapist with her top tips for healthy skin.

Before:

We recorded this first thing in the morning to really catch me with just woken up skin.
Before Shot

Before

Before you begin, make sure all your hair is off your face, I’ve pushed mine back with a headband and tied it up.

Before

Step 1: Prime with ‘Bad Gal’ to give you a brightening complexion before you begin – also useful to use if you have dry skin.

Step 2: Apply ‘Erase Paste’ to camouflage under eye circles and big blemishes – it really is a ‘paste’ you need to brush across your skin but gives a really even coverage


Step 3: Apply ‘Boi-ing’ Concealer to cover little blemishes and other imperfections – you can use your finger or a brush to apply it.

Step 4: Apply ‘Lemon Aid’ to eyelids for an awakened look – you CAN look like you’ve had enough sleep!

Step 5: Highlight and Cover using ‘Eye Bright’ – highlighting with a moisturising foundation helps to blend my concealing in with the rest of my face
After

After – a really fresh look

No matter what your skin type, this kit can really help change the way your skin looks. It comes with everything you need to apply the make-up in a gorgeous little box. You can buy this kit across the country, from Debenhams to feelunique.com.

It will set you back around £25 – but it’s worth every penny.

Sally works hard to keep her skin clear

Sally Rust, 31, Loughborough, has her own Beauty Therapy business.

“Many of my clients swear by Benefit products compared to more expensive alternatives. Although its important to have a good concealer, it’s also important to take good care of your skin.”

“You need to find a cleanser, toner and moisturiser that suits your skin. It’s all a case of trial and error but everyone has different needs in their skin care regime. “

“When using products on your face always massage upwards, it can prevent sagging skin with age”

“The most important part of anyone’s skin regime is how much water they drink. If you keep your body hydrated and free of toxins such as alcohol your skin will show many benefits.”

Sally suggests a cleanse tone and moisturise twice daily, and at least 6 glasses of water to keep your skin beautifully clear.

“Another thing to keep in mind is how often you go without make up- although difficult, it’s important for your skin to have a day to breathe. Why not be brave and go bare!?”

 

Read more from Bridget