Make up artist Sally Bunting: “Never let your creativity be caged, let it out”

Words by Steph Hodgkinson

Make up artist Sally Bunting

Make up artist Sally Bunting. Image courtesy of Sally

Make up artist Sally Bunting, 21, has been freelancing for the past few years. She gives Polka Dots & Potions an insight into the highs and lows of her job…

Being a make up artist might seem like one of the most glamorous careers, but life as a make up artist isn’t easy. Freelancing is particularly difficult in the current economic climate, as make up artist Sally Bunting says: “It’s a very expensive career and the work isn’t always constant.

“It’s hard because people assume I can get to all the locations easily. There are always people who want something for nothing as well but the products are expensive, so I have to think whether it’ll be of any benefit to me and my portfolio.”

The 21-year-old from Sheffield has been freelancing for the past few years and does make up for everything from weddings and proms to music videos, photoshoots and fashion shows. She studied cosmetic, theatrical, special effects and media make up at Sheffield City College.

Sally's 'wound' special effects make up

Sally’s ‘wound’ special effects make up. Image courtesy of Sally

Sally is under pressure to get the look right to ensure her clients are satisfied with their makeovers. She says: “There is a certain amount of pressure, but I always emphasise that if they want anything changing that they tell me. I wouldn’t be offended.

“A lot of it comes down to personal preference, especially with weddings, but I include a trial with my wedding packages to prevent situations like that on their big day.”

Sally’s favourite shoot was one of her first shoots for a photography student. “Her theme was ‘The Seven Deadly Sins’. It was really fun, and I enjoyed how I had a theme to stick to, but each look was totally different.”

Sally on the set of a photoshoot. Image courtesy of Megan Smith

Sally on the set of a photoshoot. Image courtesy of Megan Smith

She says the highlights of the job outweigh the expenses, though: “One of the best things about the job is the proud feeling I get when I get the images back, or when I help to make a bride’s day special.”

Her dream client would be Lady Gaga or Marilyn Manson because “both are incredibly individual and their looks are very creative.”

So which products does she swear by? “There’s a discontinued No7 Highlighter, which I cherish! It looks amazing for any look, especially bridal makeup. Brand-wise I use a lot of MAC, Illamasqua and Ben Nye. I’m also HD airbrush trained, so I use Airbase for that.”

Although it can sometimes be tough, Sally’s found her ideal career. What’s her advice for aspiring make up artists?

“Save up as much money as you can! It helps when you can afford high quality brushes and products. Also, never let your creativity be ‘caged’, let it out.”

Make up by Sally, modelled by Sally

Sally modelling her make up techniques. Image courtesy of Sally

Read more from Steph here

City centre flashmob shows ‘fearsome’ fashion through experimental make-up

by Railah Iqbal

Photographer: Anwar Suleman Models: Emily, Lia, Emily, Nieve (stood up) and Polly (left to right) Courtesy of Lauren Eaton

Photographer: Anwar Suleman Models: Emily, Lia, Emily, Nieve (stood up) and Polly (left to right) Courtesy of Lauren Eaton

Lauren Eaton, Freelance Make-up Artist, put together the recent Sheffield flash mob when models took on the city centre, exhibiting gothic fashion.

Lauren, 23, of Sheffield, used experimental make-up artistry with a collaboration of fearsome fashion, to explore onlookers’ reaction to non-cliché looks. She said; “This was an exploration of public fashion. I incorporated the looks that people did not enjoy into the flashmob to test reactions to horrific looks.”

Photographer: Anwar Suliman Model: Polly Make-up artist: Lauren Eaton (left)

Photographer: Anwar Suliman Model: Polly Make-up artist: Lauren Eaton (left)

To produce the models images, Lauren explained that she used peculiar and unconventional make-up ideas and pure experimental make-up. Further she took inspiration from the new romantic art, fashion and underground club-culture eras; “where individuals would peacock to dress for attention.”

Photographer: Anwar Suleman Models: Emily, Nieve, Emily, Polly (left to right)  Courtesy of Lauren eaton

Photographer: Anwar Suleman Models: Emily, Nieve, Emily, Polly (left to right)
Courtesy of Lauren Eaton

She added; “I contoured the face and was vastly inspired by androgynous themes where men dressed like women and women like men. I aimed to shock people with my experimental make-up techniques.”
This project, as part of Lauren’s degree in make-up artistry and special effects make-up at Bradford College, was an idea branching out from a previous project where Lauren produced a ‘hypothetical’ campaign for High-street mogul; Topshop where she identified the looks that people detested and feared.

Topshop campaign (courtesy of Lauren Eaton)

Topshop campaign (courtesy of Lauren Eaton)

The team behind the execution of the flash mob included models, photographers and cameramen from numerous places in Yorkshire. She said; “I was lucky really because all these different people came together to help me form this amazing project.”
Lauren said she had audience members follow her and the team throughout Sheffield which was unexpected because “I went for a look totally out of context to the ordinary. I thought people would look once and then look away.”

A public exhibition of Lauren’s creations for the flashmob will be shown in Bradford College next month.
Lauren also specializes in bridal, editorial, catwalk fashion as well as experimental make-up and resources throughout South Yorkshire. To check out her work, visit Lauren’s webpage.

Read more stories from Railah